Art

‘A more beautiful and meaningful space’; Burlington residents invited to Indigenous Art Walk

Marvin Terry shows his art pieces that adorn a hydro box at Spencer Smith Park. The installation includes a chinook salmon and a polar bear.Marvin Terry shows his art pieces that adorn a hydro box at Spencer Smith Park. The installation includes a chinook salmon and a polar bear.

Everyone is invited to an Indigenous Art Walk and Spring Equinox Celebration.

Starting at 11:30 a.m. on March 20 at the gazebo in Burlington’s Spencer Smith Park, the event will include an opening prayer, art walk through nine Indigenous pieces at the park, a ceremonial fire and the unveiling of a new art piece at Joseph Brant Museum. The walk is expected to end at the museum at roughly noon.

Angela Paparizo, manager of arts and culture at the City of Burlington, said the local art commissions celebrate the work of local First Nations, Métis and Inuit artists.

“This meaningful collection of Indigenous art for Spencer Smith Park is very important: It creates a more beautiful and meaningful space for everyone and helps to remind us of the land we’re on. I’m grateful to the work of these artists and the collaboration with local Indigenous peoples in helping us with this project and important celebration,” said Paparizo.

Last summer, artists were invited to propose artwork that has now been installed as vinyl wraps on a series of nine large electrical boxes located in Spencer Smith Park. Nine commissions of $2,000 each were available.

At the end of the walk at Joseph Brant Museum, residents are invited to join local Indigenous Peoples including Chief Stacey Laforme of the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation for a Smudging Ceremony, Opening Prayer, music and a celebration of the new sculpture Conversations and Stories by David General. Attendees can sample traditional Indigenous cuisine as the celebration event wraps up with a travelling song.

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